Any Cat Experts Out There?

We’ve decided to adopt a kitten! I am too excited for words. I am also obsessed, especially when it comes to diet. I had a cat as a child Garfield (I loved him to bits) and I remember that my mom fed him Meow Mix and I remember that he was so addicted to Meow Mix that he literally wouldn’t eat anything else even treats! Nothing just Meow Mix. He developed a lot of issues later in life, some of which, I believe were caused by his poor diet. Anyways I have always found it suspicious how addictive many pet foods are and how weird it is that cats seem almost locked into one food for their whole life. Can they really not handle any variety? Is that even okay?

Back to my questions

I will be bringing my new kitty home when she is around 12 weeks old. The breeder will introduce her to a brand of wet food that I don’t plan on using myself. Idealistically I would love to have my future cat on a wet food diet or one of the quality premade raw diets available at my local pet store but realistically I believe that I will have to go with a combination of high quality dry food and high quality wet or raw food. My problem is that I don’t know when to introduce what. Should I start introducing the dry food I plan to use first? Or the wet food? Or should I introduce them at the same time? If introducing separately how long should I wait between? How long should I wait after the kitten’s arrival before I begin introducing new foods?

I have read a lot about the raw food movement and feel pretty good about my local options but I have some concerns about using raw food before the kitten’s immune system is fully developed. So should I hold off and introduce raw food when the kitten is older?

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6 responses to “Any Cat Experts Out There?

  1. I’m a dog person, though don’t dislike cats.
    Maggie is on dried food and has been since a pup. She eats when she’s hungry, so it works as we can leave it down without it stinking the place out or ‘going off’, though it is replaced if her bowl isn’t cleared. Plenty of fresh water which is changed twice daily. I would suggest introducing Kitty gradually to whatever food you want her to have as to try and do it immediately could result in all kinds of horrible events. Your breeder may well give you an owner’s guide/package to help you.
    Good luck!

    • Some animals regulate themselves very well. Our hamster was really good about choosing the healthy options and not eating too much but some animals eat themselves sick. Not sure yet how kitty will be. I hope she is open-minded about food and has healthy habits so we don’t have to chain the fridge lol Cats need wet food more than pups do. Thanks =)

  2. Good luck with your new Kitty. I’ve had cats, but so much has changed since I’ve had them… Best you get local advice. You’ll need a vet for shots… and possible spaying if you go that route. Ask them.

    I do know though that real milk and cheese aren’t really good for cats. Once weened and all. Always be careful with ingredient lists on packaged stuff. And even if you choose to make your own pet food. People food doesn’t always translate to pet food. 🙂

    • I think I will offer a variety of high quality wet food and some raw food. I don’t think I would feel comfortable making a diet for a carnivore haha An omnivore or herbivore sure but a carnivore means a lot of organs and meat grinding. Thanks so much Jules we are all very excited =)

  3. what kind of cat is this Yves?
    i.e. breed?

    as for diet etc. ?

    whatever routes you choose, the best thing to do, is adapt/transform slowly –
    the first couple of days and weeks, your new house companion will be adjusting …. to a new place, with all kinds of discoveries, a new litter box, and all of that.
    the most difficult thing about transitions for an animal, is leaving and starting new – although most adapt easily, so the last thing you want is to place additional stress on their bodies, by suddenly changing foods, diets.

    you can technically, once an animal has a clean bill of health, switch diets by slow integrations – i.e. never swap out one food type/brand for another in one go — always incorporate, mix in a “new” variety with the old, so they can adapt and adjust –
    this also helps them not be so “fussy” when you decide to end up with your new choices –

    but don’t be over “fussing” – because too much of a “supposed” “better” thing is just as ridiculous as trying to keep a child healthy by over-compensating –
    so unless the new fur baby has health issues that require a very specific diet – then usually, it’s not such a big deal ….
    just make sure you always have fresh water available –
    and be sure to have your baby checked out by your vet – after a few weeks in your home – for whatever shots/vaccines etc. will/may be necessary …. as well as any other issues, like parasites etc. If the fur baby is healthy, then everyone in the 2-legged family can breathe easier and be safe.

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